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Life in a day: Anti-stereotyping (LVL: Asian)


Hello Reader! Here’s another Life in a Day article, made for you, yes you, a teenager, which was made by me (obviously). This article will talk about expectations people have from you based on stereotypes and the rest.

Now I’ll start by stereotypes by continent. Westerners have this crazy idea that ALL Asians are geniuses, and have all kinds of special talents! For example, ALL Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese are good in math, they think ALL the Japanese are tech experts, and they think that ALL Koreans can and SHOULD be able to out dance them in Gangnam style! And of course, the dumber westerners think that ALL Asians are Chinese. What the hell!? (I experienced this first hand…but I am not Chinese nor do I look like one.)

Here is a perfect example of this stereotype.

Am I the only Asian here that doesn’t have a special talent?!?! No I’m not. There are TONS of us! And yet people, Westerner or not, still tend to have this high expectation of us. But why?!

Here is a simple solution for when a person or a group of people expect you to be or do something you’re not and can’t do. It’s uber simple. It is actually the simplest and smartest thing you can do.

Just say, “No, I can’t do that,” or “No, that’s not me.” Don’t be afraid to say those words! Sure whenever people expect great things to come out of you, you feel a little flattered right? But sometimes those expectations are what THEY want from you, what THEY want you to do, and what THEY think is good for you. You need to focus on what YOU want and what YOU want to do, and what YOU think is good for you. It’s better to give other people the picture of how you see yourself, rather than to reassure them that the picture they see of you (which might be the wrong picture) is the right one. In other words, always tell the truth about yourself, B*TCH!

Don’t feel ashamed of yourself whenever you have to say those words. That is a sign of insecurity. Always be proud of yourself, but remember, only to the right extent. Too much of everything isn’t good after all. Acknowledge the things you can’t do, and be proud of the things you can do (again, only to the right extent). And then show the people, your friends, your family etc. what is the extent of what you can do so that they may neither underestimate nor overestimate you. And of course, they will not expect too much or too little of you.

And throughout time, update them of how far that extent has risen, because come on, you WILL progress. Nobody stays the same or “dormant” forever right?

See? Simple isn’t it? When you find it hard to say a truthful “No” and easier to say a dishonest “Yes” then, I really do hope that your conscience eats you. But hey, sometimes saying yes, can lead you to discovering something new, and you’ll either like it, or not. It’s ultimately up to you. I hope you found this article useful! Until the next article!

Here are random pictures that I think will best describe this article. (This feature will be found in my articles from now on. Problem? If yes, TOO BAD FOR YOU!)

(This hipster photo is not mine)

(neither does this)

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One comment on “Life in a day: Anti-stereotyping (LVL: Asian)

  1. dragoonthegreat
    November 19, 2012

    Lots of love to this article because of the random Sherlock photo ❤

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This entry was posted on November 10, 2012 by in A Day in a Life and tagged , , , , , , .

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